Learning From Books With Popplet

In the age of digital, one might be tempted to diminish or even forget the importance of the written word in education. Fortunately for our learners, their teachers most certainly have not and literacy skills, along with other valued core skills, continue to occupy their rightful place in the curriculum despite and because of the growth of the digital classroom.

Literacy isn’t just restricted to the study of books. However, analyzing a piece of quality text or even a well-known story can reveal much about what’s great and progressive about reading and writing, and also provide endless opportunities for more in-depth study and learning, for example:

  • Story building – how a narrative is constructed and how this impacts on the reader.
  • Themes – the exploration of a book’s main elements.
  • Character analysis – who are the main characters, what shapes them, why do they do what they do?
  • Cause and effect – who or what makes things happen. Events are connected.
  • Quotes and other memorable pieces of writing – why do they affect the reader so, why are they memorable?
  • Significant events – what are those happenings that determine the outcome of a story or the fate of a character? What matters?
  • Language study – focusing on grammar, parts of speech (adjectives, adverbs, nouns…), technique.
  • Identification – gaining a deeper understanding of ourselves and others from the people, places, and events described in a story.

Popplet is present in many classrooms. Fortunately for us, teachers and learners often publish impressive examples of their Popplet work.  Popplet’s easy-to-use and powerful features make it a very useful addition to any lesson, especially in the literacy classroom, as you will see.

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Teaching Reading Skills with Popplet

There’s a lot to learn and learning begins on the very first day of our lives! It might even begin before birth, but since nobody has ever been born with the innate ability to read and write, we know that these well-known signature skills of a civilization must be acquired and nurtured.



There are many other essential skills that a fledgling human learns: eating with a spoon, getting on with others, getting dressed… and most do so at different rates. However, when a child reaches classroom age, understanding the symbolic representation and reproduction of language becomes of primary importance – with good reason.

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